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   MINERAL MAKE-UP:  A Cosmetic Evolution
 
 
 
2011 - Volume 1 Issue 1
Vida Fronteriza
Beauty
 
Article: Charlotte Tallman
 
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Mineral make-up has been on the rise. Once only seen in specialty stores and boutiques, mineral make-up is now covering the pages of women’s magazines and taking up time on television cosmetic commercials.

As a cosmetic evolution born on the mid-1970s, mineral make-up was created from natural, finely ground minerals from the earth. The earth-loving members of society at the time embraced the connection between earth and body, and relished the make-up made without chemicals, dyes and preservatives.


    Resources

Mineral make-up can be found at the following locations in your area.


Skin-Scriptions
3961 E Lohman Ave.
Las Cruces, NM
575-571-8940
More Information

Katharoz Cosmetic
Boutique and Spa

3850 Foothills Rd.
Las Cruces, NM
575-522-3538
katharozcosmetic
boutique.com


Sol MedSpa
141 Roadrunner Pkwy.
Las Cruces, NM
575-521-7111
drscotmartin.com

San Francisco's Mineral Cosmetics Studio
7051 S Desert Blvd
El Paso, TX
915-877-4224
sanfranciscosmineral
cosmetics.com


Bare Escentuals
7040 N Mesa St.
El Paso, TX
915-833-0222
bareescentuals.com
   
  Information

For more information on
adult acne, check out
these online resources:


acne.org

mayoclinic.com

acne.com

webmd.com

acneresource.org

Now, society as a whole is embracing the light, long-lasting, natural glow that comes from mineral make-up. Mineral make-up contains minerals such as titanium dioxide, zinc oxide and mica and is said to be a pure alternative to traditional make-up because it is free of irritants like synthetic dyes, preservatives and fragrances. Some dermatologists claim mineral make-up is actually soothing to skin because minerals like titanium dioxide and zinc oxide have anti-inflammatory properties. Mineral make-up is also non-comedongenic, so it won't clog pores.

While mineral make-up does seem near perfect as far as make-up coverings go, it is important to keep in mind a few things when deciding whether to switch from traditional make-up to mineral make-up.

  • Mineral make-up is sometimes thought to provide sun-protection, however it does not provide all the protection needed to keep skin safe from the rays. Use an SPF based face cream under the make-up for extra protection.

  • Not all mineral make-up is composed of just minerals. Check brands for ones that don’t use synthetics and those that do. Some brands add fillers such as chemicals, binders, dyes and preservatives, but are still able to list the terms “all natural” or “all mineral formula”. Visit cosmeticsdatabase.com and enter a product name or ingredient to learn more about specific make-up ingredients. The site takes you to Skin Deep, a safety guide to cosmetics and personal care products provided by researchers at the Environmental Working Group.

  • Mineral make-up doesn’t work for everyone. If the make-up makes your skin dry, or increases the look of fine lines or wrinkles, try something else. If your skin reacts negatively, find something else.

Not Again! - Dealing with Adult Acne

Remember the days of teenage angst when life whirled around friends, social events, the phone and acne? Yes, acne – the one thing that, more than likely, mingled with everything else teen. Well, even if you are out of school, moving ahead in your career and even raising your own teenagers, there is a good chance you might have to face it again.

Adult acne is common in 25 percent of men and 50 percent of women, according to acne.org, and adult-like causes are to blame. As a teen or young adult, acne is often caused by an onset of androgenic hormones, but adults can face acne as a result of stress, hormones, cosmetics, prescription drugs and pregnancy.

To understand acne, and the ways to treat it, it’s important to understand how it develops. Despite claims that acne is caused by eating chocolate or drinking sodas, acne is actually caused when natural oils can’t reach the skin’s surface, which results in the sebaceous glands plugging up hair follicles with the oil. The blockage causes swelling, otherwise known as pimples or blackheads, and can lead to infection-caused cysts. Fluctuating hormones caused by stress or pregnancy, chemicals for prescription drugs or rubbing on the face by headgear or hair falling on the face (leaving more oil than produced) are all causes of acne.

Acne treatments work by reducing oil production, speeding up skin cell turnover, fighting bacterial infection and reducing the inflammation. With most prescription acne treatments, you may not see results for four to eight weeks, and your skin may get worse before it gets better. Young adults are encouraged to use oil-free, noncomedogenic lotion or sunscreens and wash with low-strength benzoyl peroxide, but those treatments can be too harsh for older skin which works better with natural ingredients like Aloe Vera, oatmeal and tea tree oil. Many times it is best to stop acne when it starts by visiting a dermatologist, because while pimples are unsightly and painful, they can turn into something much worse, like dime-size cystic infections which lead to scarring and diminished self-esteem. Dermatologists are also able to monitor acne and regulate prescription medication to treat it. Acne treatments include topical retinoic acid, alpha-hydroxy acid, topical antibiotics, antibiotic pills, birth control (to regulate hormonal fluctuations), and Accutane. More evasive, and expensive, treatments include extractions (a safe way to pop pimples), microderm abrasion, chemical peels, corticosteroid injections and laser treatments.

Treating acne at home or preventing it once it is gone should become a daily routine. Mayoclinic.com recommends using topical creams on acne-prone areas as recommended by your dermatologist and incorporate daily face washing with a gentle cleanser while avoiding picking and pinching. Remember, washing too much can irritate the skin but washing too little can lead to clogged up hair follicles. Look for over-the-counter creams or gels that help dry excess oil, but remember older adult skin doesn’t do well when confronted with benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid. Avoid heavy foundation make-up and always remove make-up before going to bed. If possible, always shower after sweating or strenuous exercise. ///
 
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